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Off-season training and recovery – Pro triathlete Kaisa Sali’s advice

Pro triathlete Kaisa Sali shares her insight on off-season training and recovery. 

Late autumn and early winter are off-season for many runners, cyclist, swimmers and triathletes. It’s the season of rest, recovery and new beginnings.

Off-season is important for athletes because it’s crucial to take a break from intensive training and allow yourself to rest and recover properly before the next race season.

Without a proper recovery period, your progress usually hits a wall sooner or later.

When you start training again with a fully recovered, revitalized, healthy body, you’ll get the best possible training benefit, whereas without a proper recovery period, your progress usually hits a wall sooner or later – usually sooner.

If I skip or neglect recovery during the fall, it comes back to bite me in early spring by the latest and I find myself getting injured and ill easily due to fatigue.

But after sufficient rest and recovery, it’s time to get back in the game… slowly and softly.

Off-season training program

This off-season training schedule is used by many top athletes, but it’s suitable for regular exercisers, too. Of course, if you’re not a pro athlete, you need to balance training and rest according to your work situation and family responsibilities. In any case, a complete break from sports and work is necessary for everyone.

  1. Kick off your off-season with a 2-week period of complete rest, or nearly no training at all.
  2. After the complete rest period, slowly start your off-season training: Take it easy for the next two weeks and do only half of the training you would normally do.

It’s good to do different sports in the beginning of your training season to give your body new, varied stimuli.

Every now and then you need a rest period longer than two weeks. For example, I was suffering from fatigue and a leg overuse injury last year after the IRONMAN World Championship in Hawaii so I decided to take six weeks off from training. During that rest period, I only did light exercise, which for me is something entirely different from triathlon, such as downhill skiing.

Moreover, it’s good to do different sports in the beginning of your training season to give your body new, varied stimuli. For example, yoga and ball sports are a great change for endurance athletes.

Allow yourself TO TAKE a break

I know, you may be thinking: “What if I lose my fitness during the break and all my hard work will be wasted?”

What if I lose my fitness during the break and all my hard work will be wasted?

If you’re enthusiastic about sports, resting isn’t always the easiest thing to do. Many of us are afraid of losing the fitness level we achieved through hard work and I admit that many times I’ve stressed too much about losing my fitness during off-season.

Sure, after a couple of weeks of rest, training feels tougher than usual but we should keep in mind that it’s surprisingly easy to get back in shape and restore your fitness level when you’re not starting from scratch.

As a rule, you could say that the more years of training you have, the more you can afford to rest. It’s not at all uncommon that elite athletes have made their record performances after coming back from injury.

Monitor your recovery

In the coming training and race season, I’m planning to monitor my recovery with the new Recovery Pro feature on my Polar Vantage V. The Recovery Pro will help me find balance between training and recovery by combining my daily recovery status (measured with the Orthostatic Test) with long-term recovery and training load. It also takes into account your subjective feeling and stress caused by other factors than training.

To avoid making the same mistakes again, I believe the Recovery Pro is going to be a key tool for me in monitoring my recovery so that I don’t go into the main race of the season with anything less than a 100% charged battery.

If you liked this post, don’t forget to share so that others can find it, too.

Please note that the information provided in the Polar Blog articles cannot replace individual advice from health professionals. Please consult your physician before starting a new fitness program.

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