Selected Product
CS200cad
(change)

Tips

Tip for using OwnZone feature

With the OwnZone feature you are able to follow the intensity of your exercise easily, keep yourself in the right heart rate target zone, and stay motivated as you can see the improvement in performance. With regular exercising you will be able to perform more with the same heart rate, e.g. your jogging speed increases.



OwnZone should be determined every time you start exercising. Daily changes such as state of mood or recovery from earlier exercise affect your OwnZone. If you go in for many sports, find your OwnZone for the different sports. The technique and economy of a sport as well as the muscle groups used affect OwnZone, too. For example, you will get different OwnZones for running and swimming.

If you are a beginner, sedentary or have overweight a recommended target is to exercise near the lower limit of your OwnZone. At this target, the exercise is easy-paced and causes only slight breathlessness and sweating. The beginner’s Golden rule: Exercise most of the time with light intensity. Do it often.

For weight-loss purpose, exercises at the lower limit or middle of the OwnZone for longer duration are needed to accumulate more energy expenditure and for the body to use fat efficiently.

If you exercise more regularly and aim for improved fitness, your best exercise intensity is at the middle or near the upper limit of your OwnZone. Exercising at the higher end of the OwnZone continuum will cause clear breathlessness and sweating.

If you are active, exercising more than 3 times a week regularly up to 1.5 hours per session and your main target is to maintain fitness or improve performance, you can sometimes exercise close to the upper limit of your OwnZone and even at heavy intensity above your OwnZone. Aim to use the whole OwnZone continuum in your exercise. Exercise both near the lower limit of your OwnZone as well at at the middle or near the upper limit. Now and then you can go even above your OwnZone if you wish to increase your maximum performance capacity.
 

Was this helpful? Yes No